United Nations chief António Guterres virtually addressed the Human Rights Council on Monday. Feb. 22, and without providing evidence warned that “hate groups” such as white supremacists and neo-Nazis are the greatest threat facing the world, ignoring crimes against humanity by council member states.

In a speech very similar to the narrative that U.S. Democratic leaders have been using to persecute and harass Trump supporters and Republicans, the socialist Guterres tried to make the world believe that the council member countries “need global coordinated action to defeat this grave and growing danger.

“White supremacy and neo-Nazi movements are more than domestic terror threats,” said Guterres, the Portuguese socialist. “They are becoming a transnational threat. Today, these extremist movements represent the number one internal security threat in several countries.”

Guterres said that these groups are supported by some people in positions of power and that during the Chinese virus crisis, they managed to increase their power, grew in numbers, recruiting members on online platforms, and traveled around the world for training.

There are three major problems with Guterres’s statements:

1. Statistics show that white supremacists, who could actually be placed within neo-Nazis or vice versa, are not high compared to other violent groups.

According to a Voice of America report, there were 51 fatalities in 2020 as a result of attacks by white supremacist groups in the United States. (Please note this report does not intend to condone violence from any group, the comparison just serves the purpose of putting Guterres’s statement in context.)

However, if we place the numbers in an international context, in January 2021 alone, terrorist attacks by Islamic extremists claimed more than 850 lives.

There were also several high-profile terrorist attacks in the United Kingdom and France in the recent past where Islamists fatally stabbed several people or used large vehicles to run over crowds of people.

2. The “Human Rights” Council is made up of several communist or socialist states that are accused of crimes against humanity such as China, Cuba, Venezuela, and others, of which Guterres made no mention.

In the case of China, there is abundant evidence of its persecution of practitioners of Falun Dafa, an ancient Chinese discipline that reached 100 million adherents in 1999.

A report published in 2000 and updated in 2017 presents concrete evidence of the systematic removal of organs from living Falun Dafa practitioners in military medical facilities run by the People’s Liberation Army.

According to Minghui.org to date, 4,632 confirmed deaths of Falun Dafa practitioners have been documented.

And the Chinese Communist Party, being the greatest threat to freedom of belief, expression, and one of the most bloodthirsty regimes in modern history, was president of the UN Human Rights Council from 2009 to 2016.

3. Having provided no evidence, data, or statistics, it is unclear which groups or individuals are considered white supremacists or neo-Nazis by Guterres’s standards, coupled with his bias for accusing the “right” for a relatively low number of crimes and overlooking genocides by the left, his call to “fight” against these groups could encompass any ideology opposed to globalism, socialism, and/or communism.