A group of people in a town in Wales reported that police threatened to fine them for trying to buy farm milk from an outdoor stall and ordered the owners to take their products to sell in the supermarket, Breitbart reported.

On Jan. 24, North Wales Live reported that about five households were lining up to shop at a self-service facility Mynydd Mostyn, in the county of Flintshire, when police arrived and dispersed the customers, warning them that they would receive 60 pound fines (US$81.99) for violating pandemic rules.

Elliw Jones, one of the farmers who sells her products there was outraged by the police action and said she contacted the local official to inquire about, and he replied, “People should be buying what they need at their weekly shop in a supermarket or nearest shop.”

Fresh milk vending machines are a relatively new development in British agriculture that helps farmers bypass the middlemen who take all the profits—the supermarkets—and reach consumers directly.

It is a matter of survival for some, as supermarkets have bargained so effectively that milk prices paid to producers have fallen below the costs needed to keep cows alive.

Mynydd Mostyn’s stall sells fresh milk, cheese, eggs, milkshakes, coffee, and hot chocolate.

At this point there are two aspects of the incident that are deeply striking.

First, these facilities are located in the open air and designed for people to maintain the social distance required by the authorities.

So, if the government’s restrictions are aimed at preventing contagion, why is the British government sending people to crowd supermarkets? The measure lacks common sense.

Second, when the lockdown measures taken by governments around the world have destroyed small businesses, restaurants and so on, they have tremendously favored large corporations and businesses.

So, when farming families start a business to survive, complying with pandemic regulations, are forced to continue to lose money, giving the profits to big business, one is left to wonder if there is collusion between the government and big business.

Jones reflected, “I feel the police should be working with us as a new business and not driving all our customers to supermarkets.”