Just a week after Justice Department Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz’s report on the Obama administration’s spying on the Trump campaign in 2016 was published, The Washington Post released another supposed leak.

Attorney General William Barr would disagree with the Inspector General that Obama officials and agents were justified in spying on Trump’s campaign and Trump’s transition team, according to the Washington Post report.

Barr may include a formal letter in the report or may publicly state his concern.

According to leaks, behind the scenes at the Department of Justice there appears to be a disagreement over one of Horowitz’s central conclusions about the origins of the Russian investigation. The conflict could be the beginning of a major rift within the federal agency over the controversial issue of investigating a presidential campaign.

Attorney General Barr told associates he disagrees with the Justice Department inspector general on one of the key findings in the upcoming report: that the FBI had enough information in July 2016 to justify launching an investigation into Trump’s campaign members.

Barr has not been influenced by Horowitz’s “logic” to conclude that the FBI had a sufficient basis to open an investigation on July 31, 2016, detail The Washington Post leaks.

Horowitz will testify in the Senate on Dec. 11 about the findings of the investigation into possible FISA abuses.

For more than a year and a half, Horowitz has been investigating an alleged abuse of FISA by the Obama Justice Department and FBI during the 2016 elections against President Trump.

But the report apparently is more than a FISA abuse, it is a whole conspiracy campaign against President Trump orchestrated by the Democratic Party in complicity with U.S. intelligence agencies.

The Horowitz report will also likely result in the declassification of documents requested by high-ranking Republican legislators for several years.

Republicans and President Trump have argued that the FBI’s alleged FISA abuses, which occurred when the federal agency sought criminal links between Trump’s campaign team and Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign, were politically motivated.

In fact, in recent months, a number of documents have been uncovered that corroborate those claims, for example:

  • Text messages obtained by Fox News showed that before the FISA application was approved FBI agents were dealing with a senior Justice Department official who had “continued concerns” about “possible bias” of a source pivotal to the application.
  • The 2016 messages, sent between Lisa Page and then FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, also revealed that members of the intelligence bureau circulated at least two ‘anti-Trump’ blog articles.
  • These text messages were based in part on information from former British spy Christopher Steele who cited Page’s alleged links to Russia. The FBI assured the FISA court that the media independently corroborated Steele’s claims, but it later came to light that Steele had previously leaked those data to the media.
  • The FBI did not clearly state that Steele worked for a company hired by Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC).

Much of the Steele dossier has been discredited or unfounded. In fact, the extensive report by special counsel Robert Mueller found no evidence of alleged collusion between Trump’s campaign members and the Kremlin.

Tags: Categories: U.S. Politics